Unit Title: Imagination

Subject Area: Reading

Grade Level: 1

 

Day 1

Standards:

  1. The student will understand and apply knowledge of the sounds of the English language, the sound-symbol relationship, and word recognition strategies to read grade level materials with accuracy and emerging fluency.
  2. The student will use a variety of strategies to develop and expand reading, listening, and speaking vocabularies.

Objectives:

  1. The student will use letter sounds, word patterns, and parts of simple compound words to decode unfamiliar words when reading.
  2. The student will read aloud grade-appropriate text with accuracy and emerging fluency.
  3. The student will learn new words through explicit instruction and independent reading.

Resources:

Copies of George Shrinks for each student and the teacher

Whiteboard, eraser, and markers

Reading journals, pencils

Time Required: 20 minutes

Questions: What would you do if you shrunk?

Assessment: Students will record the new words in their reading journals and create a sentence using each word correctly.

Anticipatory Set:

Introduce the book George Shrinks. I will have students look at the cover as I tell them the title. I will ask "What do you think the story is about, based on the title and cover?" "What would you do if you shrunk? (pause for responses) I wonder if George will do any of those things." I will have students take a picture walk through the book and talk about the things they notice in the pictures.

Lesson Presentation

Mini lesson: Vocabulary

I will introduce words that may be difficult for the students in the text. The words I have selected from this book are: dreamt, quietly, sure, and trouble. I will write each word, one at a time, on my whiteboard. I will tell the students what the word is and what it means. Once all four words have been introduced, I will rewrite them all on the whiteboard and leave them there while the students read the book. This way they can refer back to the board while reading if necessary.

Guided Practice: The students will read independently as I listen. I will assist with decoding as needed.

Check for Understanding: When students have finished reading, we will review the new vocabulary words.

Assessment: Students will record the new words in their reading journals and create a sentence using each word correctly.

Closure: Students will share the sentences they create

 

Day 2

Standards:

  1. The student will understand and apply knowledge of the sounds of the English language, the sound-symbol relationship, and word recognition strategies to read grade level materials with accuracy and emerging fluency.

Objectives:

  1. The student will use letter sounds, word patterns, and parts of simple compound words to decode unfamiliar words when reading.
  2. The student will read aloud grade-appropriate text with accuracy and emerging fluency.

Resources:

Copies of George Shrinks for each student and the teacher

Set of magnetic letters for each student and the teacher

Metal trays for each student and the teacher

Reading journals, pencils

Time Required: 20 minutes

Questions: How can we use word patterns to figure out tricky words?

Assessment: Students will use magnetic letters to create words that have the Vowel-Consonant-e pattern.

Anticipatory Set:

Review the text. "Who remembers one of the things George did in the book?"

Lesson Presentation

Mini lesson: Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/Spelling

"There are several words in this book that have a silent "e" at the end. Who remembers what the silent "e" does to a vowel?" (pause for answers) "Yes. The silent "e" makes the vowel long. Today as you are reading, I want you to look for words that fit the long vowel, silent "e" pattern. When you find one, write it down in your reading journal. When we are finished reading, we will talk about these words."

Guided Practice: Students will read quietly as I listen in. As they read, they will record silent "e" words in their journals.

Check for Understanding: After the students have finished reading, we will discuss the words they recorded in their journals. I will pass out the magnetic letters and trays and have the students make the words as we talk about them. Then I will ask them to make new words that fit the vowel-consonant-e pattern. I will be observing to determine who can do this easily and who needs more support.

There are three words in the text that look like they fit the pattern, but do not: some, love, and were. If the students bring these words up, I will explain that not all words follow the rules, and that is why we need to think about what sounds right and what makes sense when we are reading. If no one brings up the words, I will ask "How did you know that (some, love, were) wasn't a word that fits the pattern?"

Assessment: Students will use magnetic letters to create words that have the Vowel-Consonant-e pattern.

Closure: Students will share the words they created.

 

Day 3

Standards:

  1. The student will understand and apply knowledge of the sounds of the English language, the sound-symbol relationship, and word recognition strategies to read grade level materials with accuracy and emerging fluency.

Objectives:

  1. Students will read aloud grade-appropriate texts with accuracy and emerging fluency.
  2. Students will notice when reading breaks down, reread and use phonetic and other strategies to self-correct.

Resources:

Copies of George Shrinks for each student and the teacher

Sheet with the text of the book one for each student (example at the end of the lesson plan)

Yellow and red markers for each student

Miscue Analysis form for each student, pencil

Time Required: 20 minutes

Questions: What does fluent reading sound like? What do different punctuation marks (comma, period, quotation marks) tell the reader to do?

Assessment: I will conduct a miscue analysis as the students read the text.

Anticipatory Set:

I will ask the students what fluent reading sounds like. I will pass out copies of the text that I have re-typed on a separate sheet. I will ask the students what they notice about the text. We will discuss the text, noting that most of it is a note written to George by his parents.

Lesson Presentation

Mini lesson: Fluency/Punctuation

Fluent readers read smoothly with expression, and they pause in the right places. How do we know when to pause in our reading? (pause for answers) The periods and commas tell us when to pause. (I will model reading a few lines without stopping for punctuation.) Did that sound fluent? (I will model reading stopping in random places and reading through the punctuation.) Was that fluent reading? Why not? (pause) What does a comma tell us to do? (take a short pause) What does a period tell us to do? (stop) Today when you read, I want you to pay special attention to the places the author wants you to pause or stop. Before you begin, I want to do an activity that will help you notice the periods and commas in the text. First, take your yellow marker and highlight all of the commas on this page. Then, take your red marker and highlight all the periods. (wait) Now, I want you to practice reading the text. It is exactly the same as the text in the book, but I have typed it on this paper so we could use the markers and you can practice reading fluently without turning pages.

Guided Practice: Students will read independently as I listen. I will be listening for fluent reading and remind them to stop or pause at punctuation as needed.

Check for Understanding: We will review what commas and periods tell readers to do.

Assessment: I will conduct a miscue analysis as the students read the text.

*Each student will participate in the guided practice, reading the text through at least once, before I do the miscue analysis. Then, while I am assessing one student, the others will work with the magnetic letter activity from yesterday, making silent "e" words.

Closure: We will review what fluent reading sounds like.

Text of George Shrinks used for this lesson

One day, while his mother and father were out, George dreamt he was small, and when he woke up he found it was true. His parents had left him a note: "Dear George," it said. "When you wake up, please make your bed, brush your teeth, and take a bath. Then clean up your room and go get your little brother. Eat a good breakfast, and don't forget to wash the dishes, dear. Take out the garbage, and play quietly. Make sure you water the plants and feed the fish. Then check the mail and get some fresh air. Try to stay out of trouble, and we'll be home soon. Love, Mom and Dad."

 

Day 4

Standards:

  1. The student will actively engage in the reading process and use a variety of comprehension strategies to understand the meaning of texts that have been read or listened to.
  2. The student will actively engage in the reading process and read, understand, respond to and appreciate a wide variety of fiction, poetic, and non-fiction texts.
  3. The student will demonstrate emerging understanding of punctuation, spelling, and capitalization.

Objectives:

  1. The student will write a response that shows comprehension of a story that has been read.
  2. The student will understand the role of illustrations in conveying meaning in picture books.
  3. The student will compose simple sentences, using correct capitalization and punctuation.

Resources:

Copies of George Shrinks for each student and the teacher

Large post-it notes

pencils

Time Required: 20 minutes

Questions: What is George thinking during the story? What would he say?

Assessment: The students will write dialogue for three pages of the story that do not have text.

Anticipatory Set:

We will talk about the role of the illustrations in this story. I will ask the students which is their favorite picture.

Lesson Presentation

Mini lesson: Comprehension

Illustrations make the text more interesting. Yesterday, we read the text without pictures. If I had never seen the pictures, if I had only read it like we read it yesterday, I wouldn't think this story was very interesting. It is the illustrations that make the story fun and interesting. On some of the pages in the book, the author does not give us any text. He wants us to use the illustrations to think about the story. As you read today, I want you to pay attention to the pages that have no text. When you are finished, choose three of those pages and think about what George might say on them. You will write dialogue for George on your post-it notes and stick them to those pages. Who remembers what kind of punctuation marks we use when we write dialogue? (discuss quotation marks) Also remember to use commas and periods when you write, so the person reading your dialogue knows when to pause and stop.

Guided Practice: Students will read independently as I listen.

Check for Understanding:  As a group we will write dialogue for the first page in the story without text, page 5. The students will make suggestions and I will write it on a post-it. Then I will ask the students to check for punctuation, quotation marks, and capital letters, all of the things I expect them to have in the dialogue they will write for the assessment.

Assessment: The students will write dialogue for three pages of the story that do not have text.

Closure: Students will trade books and read the dialogue their partner has written.

 

Day 5

Standards:

  1. The student will compose various pieces of writing.
  2. The student will demonstrate emerging knowledge of punctuation, spelling, and capitalization.
  3. The student will actively engage in the reading process and read, understand, respond to and appreciate a wide variety of fiction, poetic, and non-fiction texts.

Objectives:

  1. The student will write a narrative text.
  2. The student will compose simple sentences using correct punctuation, capitalization, and the correct spelling of grade-appropriate, high frequency sight words.
  3. The student will respond to text and use details from stories to support interpretation and make personal connections.

Resources:

Writing paper, half blank for illustrations and half lined for writing

pencils

crayons

Time Required: 20 minutes

Questions: What would you do if you shrunk?

Assessment: The students will write and draw about what they would do if they shrunk.

Anticipatory Set:

Review the things that George did in the story. Ask the students to think about what they would do if they were small.

Lesson Presentation

Mini lesson: Writing

Today you are going to write and draw about what you would do if you were in George's situation. When you are writing, make sure you have periods at the end of your sentences and capital letters at the beginning. If you don't remember how to spell a word, what could you do? (look at the word wall, say the word slowly and write the sounds you hear) Remember, if it's a word wall word, we have to spell it correctly. When you are finished writing, you may work on your illustration. Remember from yesterday what we said about illustrations and how important they are to make our writing interesting.

Guided Practice: As the students work on their writing, I will help them as needed.

Assessment: The students will write and draw about what they would do if they shrunk.

Closure: The students will share their writing.

 

 

Rubric for scoring student writing.

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

Content

Content of writing was not related to the assignment.

Content of writing was related to the assignment.

Content of writing was related to the assignment. Writing included several details.

 

Illustration

Illustration did not match writing.

Illustrations matched writing.

Illustrations matched writing. Illustration showed detail.

 

Punctuation and Capitalization

Writing contained multiple errors.

Writing contained only one error.

Writing contained no errors.